There came a time when Hazel Grace was on the ground; Augustus is now with the stars and after a short-lived journey, Hazel ends the story with the word “Okay.” As the credits start to roll and the lights turn on one by one, in an instant, the curiosity of the vanished universe of the story starts to pressure my mind. A story this tragic makes me crave for what will happen next in Hazel’s life, even though it ends there.

It is said that a story’s universe starts when the storyteller mentions the first word, when a reader reads the first word of the book, and when the first frame starts on a film, and then it ends when the curtains close and the screen turns to black. A most thought-of topic of mine that I’ve been telling to my uninterested friends is the concept of how the story continues beyond the period of its universe.

Non-fictional stories are the easiest ones to let go from the back of my mind since the events that happened after have been stated and known. The Holocaust may be just a tragic story of blood, bones, sticks, and dead bodies for someone who doesn’t know any history. It may be just a fragment of a remembering inside a clueless head, but for me and the ones who get really interested with social and historical events, this is a very true story. The verification and the truth of the Holocaust make me sad and sick, for it happened, but the comfort of not wanting to learn more satisfies me and leaves me at peace and praying for every soul that ascended into the hands of God during that time.

The universe of the non-fiction lives on and on and we live in it from day to day. The Holocaust, the two World Wars, 9/11, the Manila Hostage Crisis, the fall of the Berlin Wall; all of it happened many years ago. The universe of the fiction writings and outputs is a different story to tell.

The universe of the fiction is immersive and expanding, yet limited to a period of time with respect to individuality. The concept of space and time certainly makes me curious about our own universe, but what about a story’s own? There are an infinite number of universes in the real world; same case for fiction.

“The Fault in Our Stars” is one of the books that I get vexed at, for I thought it was a hipster book. Anything that has to deal with kissing and a cover targeting young females makes me throw up, but I must admit that these books are the ones that I find precocious and delicate, for they leave something behind to think about. Will Grayson, Will Grayson; The Hunger Games; Harry Potter and the whatever; the post-madness that creep up your mind, thinking of the future of the book’s characters and their universe, makes you question more. What will happen to Katniss after the end? What happens to James Potter in his first day in Hogwarts? These questions makes me cringe in a good way, and that’s something special.

Fiction stories that are latest and above the ground in the modern world will never compare to the classics, whether in book or film. Fight Club; Oh God; Forrest Gump; These were the stories that left you hanging for more, forcing you awake for numerous nights, thinking of the world you lived in for a period of time and realizing that that favorite character of yours is already dead from the moment you laid those eyes on that first word.

The concept and realization of the universe has inspired me and left me querying. This idea of the great universe only known in our heads is not meant to be shared with others, for they bore out of the conversation and leave you saying blubber, but meant to be reused and recycled to get another idea or story.

Inside the human mind is a very complex map of thoughts, memories, emotions, and song lyrics, but what I’m saying is throughout this map, there is a certain place where you store curiosity for an undiscovered or unreal universe. I have, and I have been reminiscing inside it ever since I watched my first cartoon.

The separation of the non-fiction and fiction has been a very immersive debate over the history of writers and writing, but we ask the question of whether or not these two separate universes can collide to form an idea.

Combining non-fiction and fiction, it is very possible to think in  those two different perspectives, but only one could be unrealistic. If the story is a non-fiction, the fiction element present could not be true or purposely left untrue. The Diary of Anne Frank is my personal example, for it gave fusion to the non-fiction and fiction, not in terms of being politically correct and facts but in terms of how I perceived the world of Anne.

Reading Anne’s diary gave me insights on how an individual thinks, which made me very curious on individual personalities. Anne’s questioning about life and her candid thoughts on the war made me cringe and smile at the same time because I know she’s going to die. The diary has no ending and leaves you grabbing at the thought of Anne writing her last word. This is a true story, which makes it a non-fiction. What makes it fiction is not about Anne making stories up, which isn’t true, but how you perceived the life of Anne after the 2 years inside their hiding space in Amsterdam.

What happened to Anne? Maybe Anne shouted for her father before their separation. Maybe she met somebody in the concentration camp. Maybe she wrote another diary. If every single one of us reads this diary and make up stories after, the possibility of mistaking the events we made up for reality is conclusive but not favorable. This is where the relation of history and biases takes part.

This undertaking of the non-fiction and fiction has been brief but leaves you craning. The truth is that nothing can make you leave this universe and join Hazel Grace in hers. You can just witness.

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